The Whole Pig
The Whole Pig - Dashwood Ont

FAQs

What is “Seasoned Pork”

Pork is Low in Sodium

I hear Pork is fat and not good for you. Is this true?

My Pork is not Tender

Hormones and Pork

How do I Cook Ground Pork

Is Pork good for our Children

What is Freezer Burn, and is it harmful?

Can I Re-Freeze Pork

What is “Seasoned Pork”

Pork labelled “seasoned” is pork that has been processed using a brine (typically water, sodium phosphate, and salt) in order to create a product that retains moisture. Other meats and poultry, such  as beef and chicken, can also be “seasoned”. Since many pork cuts are very low in fat, they can tend to become dry and perceived as tough after cooking. Seasoned pork allows for a more tender and  juicy product even if overcooked or held warm for periods of time.

The addition of water, sodium phosphate and salt to meat or poultry allows the product to retain moisture throughout cooking: the sodium phosphate binds the water molecules to the protein in the meat, and the salt acts as an enabler in the process. Seasoned meats and poultry are not flavoured or spiced, so do not have a noticeably different taste than unseasoned products. Not all pork sold at retail is seasoned, however pork that is seasoned must be labelled as such. Seasoned pork must also be labelled with a list of ingredients as well as a declaration of percent meat protein. Pork that has not been seasoned (i.e. a single ingredient meat product) usually does not have an ingredient list or a Nutrition Facts table. A Nutrition Facts table is required on all meat and poultry with added phosphates and/or water. The amount of sodium for a seasoned product will be higher than for an unseasoned product. For example, an average seasoned centre-cut pork loin chop (100 g/3 oz) has about 300 mg of sodium (this will vary according to cut and manufacturer). To put this in perspective, the recommended Upper Tolerable Limit for healthy adults is 2300 mg of sodium per day (about 1 tsp/5 mL of salt)*. The amount of sodium recommended for healthy Canadians aged 9-50 is 1500 mg per day, and 1300mg per day for Canadians aged 51-70. People on sodium-restricted diets should follow their doctor’s advice, and carefully read labels in all cases.

*Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes: The essential guide to nutrient requirements.
The National Academies Press, WashingtonDC, 2006

Pork is Low in Sodium

Fresh pork cuts are naturally low in sodium. There is an average 55 mg of sodium in a100 gram serving of pork; this is only 2 % of the Daily Value for sodium. Pork that is processed (ham, bacon, etc) or pork labeled as "seasoned" will have added sodium.

The Whole Pig Products are not "seasoned".  See definition below

What is “Seasoned Pork”

Pork labelled “seasoned” is pork that has been processed using a brine (typically water, sodium   phosphate, and salt) in order to create a product that retains moisture. Other meats and poultry, such  as beef and chicken, can also be “seasoned”. Since many pork cuts are very low in fat, they can tend to become dry and perceived as tough after cooking. Seasoned pork allows for a more tender and  juicy product even if overcooked or held warm for periods of time.

The addition of water, sodium phosphate and salt to meat or poultry allows the product to retain moisture throughout cooking: the sodium phosphate binds the water molecules to the protein in the meat, and the salt acts as an enabler in the process. Seasoned meats and poultry are not flavoured or spiced, so do not have a noticeably different taste than unseasoned products. Not all pork sold at retail is seasoned, however pork that is seasoned must be labelled as such. Seasoned pork must also be labelled with a list of ingredients as well as a declaration of percent meat protein. Pork that has not been seasoned (i.e. a single ingredient meat product) usually does not have an ingredient list or a Nutrition Facts table. A Nutrition Facts table is required on all meat and poultry with added phosphates and/or water. The amount of sodium for a seasoned product will be higher than for an unseasoned product. For example, an average seasoned centre-cut pork loin chop (100 g/3 oz) has about 300 mg of sodium (this will vary according to cut and manufacturer). To put this in perspective, the recommended Upper Tolerable Limit for healthy adults is 2300 mg of sodium per day (about 1 tsp/5 mL of salt)*. The amount of sodium recommended for healthy Canadians aged 9-50 is 1500 mg per day, and 1300mg per day for Canadians aged 51-70. People on sodium-restricted diets should follow their doctor’s advice, and carefully read labels in all cases.

*Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes: The essential guide to nutrient requirements.
The National Academies Press, WashingtonDC, 2006

I hear Pork is fat and not good for you.  Is this true?

Pork is Trans Fat free

In the past, pork had a reputation of being fat, and lets face it pigs did not get the high end feeds.  They were fed the Kitchen waste a lot of times.  With the advanced breeding programs of today and being fed their nutritionally balanced diets they are not the same animals of 30 years ago. I dare say our pigs receive a better nutritionally balanced diet then some of our High School students. Ribs, bacon and blade cuts are higher in fat. Let's also remember to keep balance in our diets as well.  Ribs, 7 days a week...not so good.  As part of balance meal planning, very good.  Bacon is also good in moderation.  The sweet/savory smokey flavoring, crispied up on a Sunday morning…..How much more Canadian can we get??

…. But I digress---Back to the lean and I will turn this over to Graeme.

“Pork contains no trans or hydrogenated fats, the two types of fats most commonly linked to heart disease. Not only is pork free of these dangerous fats, but almost 50% of the fat found in pork is monounsaturated, the same heart healthy fat found in olive oil!

During the anti-fat craze of the 1970s and 80s all pork products, regardless of fat content, were labeled as "foods to avoid". This "pork = fat" idea persisted despite numerous cuts of pork providing less than 6 grams of fat per serving!

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